Asbestos testing laboratory

In Airsafe’s state of the art laboratory, we analyse samples using:

  • Polarised Light Microscopy (PLM)
  • Dispersion Staining (DS) techniques

Our detailed testing process involves highly specialised equipment such as a Polarised Light Microscope. Here is a simplified summary of the process we use to test samples for asbestos:

  1. Sample treatment (if required) to release or isolate fibres
  2. Mounting of representative fibres on microscope slides
  3. Identification of different fibrous components using Polarised Light Microscopy

If no asbestos is identified during this process, we undertake additional searches for small asbestos fibres on random sub-samples of a few milligrams.

Airsafe's procedure represents the most up-to-date, rigorous and reliable method of testing for asbestos. As a result, our asbestos testing laboratory is fully accredited by NATA, the National Association of Testing Authorities.  

NATA Accreditation details

Airsafe is a NATA accredited public testing service (Accreditation No: 2959). Our accreditation covers the following:

  • 7.82 Workplace environment and hazards
    • .01 Asbestos fibre counting
      • Estimation of airborne asbestos fibres by the membrane filter method described in the National Occupational Health and Safety Commission Guidance Note (2005) and in-house method AS 101
    • .31 Asbestos fibre identification
      • Qualitative identification in bulk samples

        listed as determination(s) by technique(s) using method(s)

        Amosite; chrysotile; crocidolite; organic fibres; synthetic mineral fibres by polarised light microscopy (including dispersion staining) using AS 4964 and in-house AS 102
    • .81 Volume measurement (air)
      • For tests under 7.82.01
  • 7.84 Residues and contaminants in constituents of the environment
    • .31 Asbestos
      • Qualitative Identification of asbestos in soils

        listed as determination(s) by technique(s) using method(s)

        Amosite; chrysotile; crocidolite; organic fibres; synthetic mineral fibres by polarised light microscopy (including dispersion staining) using AS 4964 and in-house AS 102

Asbestos identification requires laboratory analysis

Asbestos identification is a matter for professionals. Unfortunately, it's impossible to identify asbestos with the naked eye, so we can't tell you over the phone whether something is or isn't asbestos.

Instead, a sample of the suspicious material needs to be examined in a NATA accredited laboratory like Airsafe's. We use advanced asbestos identification techniques such as polarized light microscopy and dispersion staining to reach a definitive answer. If we do identify a sample as containing asbestos, we can also give you advice about what to do next.

Get an asbestos sample tested »

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